• The ACSER-developed Namuru GPS receiver being tested in the cubesat flight. Credit: UNSW ACSER
    The ACSER-developed Namuru GPS receiver being tested in the cubesat flight. Credit: UNSW ACSER
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A  cubesat for defence applications tests that carries new GPS technology was launched along with a host of other research cubesats at 1am AEST on Wednesday to the International Space Station (ISS).

Project Biarri is a collaborative cubesat program, led by BAE Systems and developed by UNSW’s Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research (ACSER) and DST Group.


 

“The project aims to develop a constellation of formation-flying satellites for a perceived military application”

 


The launch of the first cubesat, known as ‘Biarri Point’, marks the first risk mitigation phase of a 5-Eyes mission in which members are working to explore cubesat formation flying. This involves an effort to better understand the drag and lift forces experienced by the CubeSats while verifying the performance of the ACSER-developed Namuru V32R3A GPS receivers and the Electro Optic Systems (EOS) space situational awareness infrastructure. Biarri Point is essentially a pathfinder satellite for the project, which aims to develop a constellation of formation-flying satellites for a perceived military application.

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